Spread

Spread may refer to:

  • Statistical dispersion
  • Spread (food), an edible paste put on other foods
  • the score difference being wagered on in spread betting
  • the measure of line inclination in rational trigonometry
  • Temperature-Dewpoint spread, dew point depression
  • Two-page spread a redundant term, also simply called "spread", referring to two adjacent, facing pages in a magazine or other publication with conjoined or connected content
  • In finance, the difference in price between related securities,
    • Bid-offer spread, between the buying and selling price of a commodity or security
    • Spread trade, between two related securities or commodities
    • Option-adjusted spread, on mortgage backed securities where the borrower has the right to repay in full
    • Yield spread, difference in percentage rate of return of two instruments
    • Yield curve spread, on mortgage backed securities
    • Credit spread (bond), on bonds
  • a term used for speed reading in policy debate.
  • The laying of Tarot cards for divinatory uses
  • Spread (film), a 2009 film

See also:

  • Seafloor spreading, the process leading to continental drift
  • Spread spectrum, communications signals over a range of frequencies
  • Spread offense, an offensive scheme in American football designed to stretch the field horizontally
  • Spread limit, a limit on a raise in poker
  • Spread polynomials, a polynomial sequence arising in rational trigonometry
  • $pread, a quarterly magazine by and for sex workers
  • "Spread", a song by OutKast from their 2003 album Speakerboxxx/The Love Below
  • Spread Toolkit - an open source toolkit that provides a high performance messaging service
  • Spreadsheet, computer application software

Famous quotes containing the word spread:

    In a moment when criticism shows a singular dearth of direction every man has to be a law unto himself in matters of theatre, writing, and painting. While the American Mercury and the new Ford continue to spread a thin varnish of Ritz over the whole United States there is a certain virtue in being unfashionable.
    John Dos Passos (1896–1970)

    Cap off
    and then what? The brains as
    helpless as oysters in a pint container,
    the nerves like phone wires.
    God, take care, take infinite care
    with the tumor lest it spread like grease.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    For a parent, it’s hard to recognize the significance of your work when you’re immersed in the mundane details. Few of us, as we run the bath water or spread the peanut butter on the bread, proclaim proudly, “I’m making my contribution to the future of the planet.” But with the exception of global hunger, few jobs in the world of paychecks and promotions compare in significance to the job of parent.
    Joyce Maynard (20th century)