Spread

Spread may refer to:

  • Statistical dispersion
  • Spread (food), an edible paste put on other foods
  • the score difference being wagered on in spread betting
  • the measure of line inclination in rational trigonometry
  • Temperature-Dewpoint spread, dew point depression
  • Two-page spread a redundant term, also simply called "spread", referring to two adjacent, facing pages in a magazine or other publication with conjoined or connected content
  • In finance, the difference in price between related securities,
    • Bid-offer spread, between the buying and selling price of a commodity or security
    • Spread trade, between two related securities or commodities
    • Option-adjusted spread, on mortgage backed securities where the borrower has the right to repay in full
    • Yield spread, difference in percentage rate of return of two instruments
    • Yield curve spread, on mortgage backed securities
    • Credit spread (bond), on bonds
  • a term used for speed reading in policy debate.
  • The laying of Tarot cards for divinatory uses
  • Spread (film), a 2009 film

See also:

  • Seafloor spreading, the process leading to continental drift
  • Spread spectrum, communications signals over a range of frequencies
  • Spread offense, an offensive scheme in American football designed to stretch the field horizontally
  • Spread limit, a limit on a raise in poker
  • Spread polynomials, a polynomial sequence arising in rational trigonometry
  • $pread, a quarterly magazine by and for sex workers
  • "Spread", a song by OutKast from their 2003 album Speakerboxxx/The Love Below
  • Spread Toolkit - an open source toolkit that provides a high performance messaging service
  • Spreadsheet, computer application software

Famous quotes containing the word spread:

    Strike on your drummes, spread out your ancyents!
    Sound out your trumpetts, sound out amaine!
    —Unknown. Sir Andrew Barton. . .

    English and Scottish Ballads (The Poetry Bookshelf)

    The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own cast- off griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy. We should impart our courage, and not our despair, our health and ease, and not our disease, and take care that this does not spread by contagion.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    A little quaker, the whole body of him trembling,
    His absurd whiskers sticking out like a cartoon-mouse,
    His feet like small leaves,
    Little lizard-feet,
    Whitish and spread wide when he tried to struggle away,
    Theodore Roethke (1908–1963)