View

A view is what can be seen in a range of vision. View may also be used as a synonym of point of view in the first sense. View may also be used figuratively or with special significance—for example, to imply a scenic outlook or significant vantage point:

The barrier Rhine hath flashed, through battle-smoke,
On men who gaze heart-smitten by the view,
As if all Germany had felt the shock!
- from The Germans on the Heights of Hochheim (1816) by William Wordsworth

Read more about View:  Law, Presenting A View in Art

Other articles related to "view":

Presenting A View in Art
... appreciation of the effects described A bright view, heavily-framed or observed as through a tunnel, can appear jewel-like and allows appreciation of composition The same view with narrower frame involves ...
USS A. J. View (1861)
... View (1861) — a Confederate States of America schooner — was captured during the beginning of the American Civil War by the Union Navy ... View was outfitted as a collier, supplying coal to Union ships with steam engines ...
Galata Tower - Gallery
... View of the Galata Tower from Eminönü, 12 April 2005 View of the Galata Tower from the Bosphorus View of the Galata Tower from the Bosphorus View of ...
Lorain, Ohio - Pictures
... Broadway, looking north, about 1908 Aerial view, looking north, 1908-1918 "At the loop", 1913 Aerial view of the harbor at Lorain, Ohio ... View is to the southeast ...
Karl Löwith
... in Meaning in History is that the western view of history is confused by the relationship between Christian faith and the modern view, which is neither Christian nor pagan ... Christians are not a historical people, as their view of the world is based on faith ... the tendency in history (and philosophy) to an eschatological view of human progress ...

Famous quotes containing the word view:

    Persistence in a single view has never been regarded as a merit in political leaders.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    In relation to God, we are like a thief who has burgled the house of a kindly householder and been allowed to keep some of the gold. From the point of view of the lawful owner this gold is a gift; From the point of view of the burglar it is a theft. He must go and give it back. It is the same with our existence. We have stolen a little of God’s being to make it ours. God has made us a gift of it. But we have stolen it. We must return it.
    Simone Weil (1909–1943)

    Human life itself may be almost pure chaos, but the work of the artist—the only thing he’s good for—is to take these handfuls of confusion and disparate things, things that seem to be irreconcilable, and put them together in a frame to give them some kind of shape and meaning. Even if it’s only his view of a meaning. That’s what he’s for—to give his view of life.
    Katherine Anne Porter (1890–1980)