View

A view is what can be seen in a range of vision. View may also be used as a synonym of point of view in the first sense. View may also be used figuratively or with special significance—for example, to imply a scenic outlook or significant vantage point:

The barrier Rhine hath flashed, through battle-smoke,
On men who gaze heart-smitten by the view,
As if all Germany had felt the shock!
- from The Germans on the Heights of Hochheim (1816) by William Wordsworth

Read more about View:  Law, Presenting A View in Art

Other articles related to "view":

Galata Tower - Gallery
... View of the Galata Tower from Eminönü, 12 April 2005 View of the Galata Tower from the Bosphorus View of the Galata Tower from the Bosphorus View of the ...
Presenting A View in Art
... to enlarge images, for full appreciation of the effects described A bright view, heavily-framed or observed as through a tunnel, can appear jewel-like and allows appreciation of composition The same view with ...
Karl Löwith
... Löwith's argument in Meaning in History is that the western view of history is confused by the relationship between Christian faith and the modern view, which ... But, Christians are not a historical people, as their view of the world is based on faith ... the tendency in history (and philosophy) to an eschatological view of human progress ...
Lorain, Ohio - Pictures
... Broadway, looking north, about 1908 Aerial view, looking north, 1908-1918 "At the loop", 1913 Aerial view of the harbor at Lorain, Ohio ... View is to the southeast ...
USS A. J. View (1861)
... View (1861) — a Confederate States of America schooner — was captured during the beginning of the American Civil War by the Union Navy ... View was outfitted as a collier, supplying coal to Union ships with steam engines ...

Famous quotes containing the word view:

    The women, who had congregated in the groves, set up the most violent clamors, as they invariably do here as elsewhere on every occasion of excitement and alarm, with a view of tranquilizing their own minds and disturbing other people.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Currently, U.S. society has been encouraged by its political and subsidized mass-media intelligentsia to view U.S. life as a continual “morning in America” paradise, where the only social problems occur in the inner cities. Psychologists call this denial.
    Ishmael Reed (b. 1938)

    Since mothers are more likely to take children to their activities—the playground, ballet or karate class, birthday parties—they get a chance to see other children in action.... Fathers usually don’t spend as much time with other people’s kids; because of this, they have a narrower view of what constitutes “normal” behavior, and therefore what should or shouldn’t require parental discipline.
    Ron Taffel (20th century)