View

A view is what can be seen in a range of vision. View may also be used as a synonym of point of view in the first sense. View may also be used figuratively or with special significance—for example, to imply a scenic outlook or significant vantage point:

The barrier Rhine hath flashed, through battle-smoke,
On men who gaze heart-smitten by the view,
As if all Germany had felt the shock!
- from The Germans on the Heights of Hochheim (1816) by William Wordsworth

Read more about View:  Law, Presenting A View in Art

Other articles related to "view":

USS A. J. View (1861)
... View (1861) — a Confederate States of America schooner — was captured during the beginning of the American Civil War by the Union Navy ... View was outfitted as a collier, supplying coal to Union ships with steam engines ...
Lorain, Ohio - Pictures
... Broadway, looking north, about 1908 Aerial view, looking north, 1908-1918 "At the loop", 1913 Aerial view of the harbor at Lorain, Ohio ... View is to the southeast ...
Presenting A View in Art
... Click to enlarge images, for full appreciation of the effects described A bright view, heavily-framed or observed as through a tunnel, can appear jewel-like and ...
Galata Tower - Gallery
... View of the Galata Tower from Eminönü, 12 April 2005 View of the Galata Tower from the Bosphorus View of the Galata Tower from the Bosphorus View of the Galata Tower from the Anatolian ...
Karl Löwith
... in Meaning in History is that the western view of history is confused by the relationship between Christian faith and the modern view, which is neither Christian nor pagan ... But, Christians are not a historical people, as their view of the world is based on faith ... tendency in history (and philosophy) to an eschatological view of human progress ...

Famous quotes containing the word view:

    Now view yourself as I was, on the spot—
    With a slight kind of engine. Do you see?
    Like this . . . You wouldn’t hang me? I thought not.”
    Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869–1935)

    He, who, in view of its inconsistencies, says of human nature the same that, in view of its contrasts, is said of the divine nature, that it is past finding out, thereby evinces a better appreciation of it than he who, by always representing it in a clear light, leaves it to be inferred that he clearly knows all about it.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    In a period of a people’s life that bears the designation “transitional,” the task of a thinking individual, of a sincere citizen of his country, is to go forward, despite the dirt and difficulty of the path, to go forward without losing from view even for a moment those fundamental ideals on which the entire existence of the society to which he belongs is built.
    Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev (1818–1883)