Multiregional Origin of Modern Humans

Multiregional Origin Of Modern Humans

The multiregional hypothesis is a scientific model that provides an explanation for the pattern of human evolution. The hypothesis holds that humans first arose near the beginning of the Pleistocene two million years ago and subsequent human evolution has been within a single, continuous human species. This species encompasses archaic human forms such as Homo erectus and Neanderthals as well as modern forms, and evolved worldwide to the diverse populations of modern Homo sapiens sapiens. The theory contends that humans evolve through a combination of adaptation within various regions of the world and gene flow between those regions. Proponents of multiregional origin point to fossil and genomic data and continuity of archaeological cultures as support for their hypothesis.

The primary alternative model, which is the predominant position held in the scientific community, is the recent African origin of modern humans, which holds that modern humans arose in Africa around 100,000–200,000 years ago, moving out of Africa around 50,000–60,000 years ago to replace archaic human forms with limited interbreeding: one with Neanderthals and one with Denisovans.

Read more about Multiregional Origin Of Modern HumansOverview, Fossil Evidence, Genetic Evidence, Recent African Origin

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origin" class="article_title_2">Multiregional Origin Of Modern Humans - Recent African Origin
... The primary competing scientific hypothesis is currently recent African origin of modern humans, which proposes that modern humans arose as a new species in Africa around 100–200,000 years ago, moving out of ... This differs from the multiregional hypothesis in that the multiregional model predicts interbreeding with local human populations in any such migration ...

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