Language - Physiological and Neural Architecture of Language and Speech

Physiological and Neural Architecture of Language and Speech

Speaking is the default modality for language in all cultures. The production of spoken language depends on sophisticated capacities for controlling the lips, tongue and other components of the vocal apparatus, the ability to acoustically decode speech sounds, and the neurological apparatus required for acquiring and producing language. The study of the genetic bases for human language is still on a fairly basic level, and the only gene that has been positively implied in language production is FOXP2, which may cause a kind of congenital language disorder if affected by mutations.

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Physiological and Neural Architecture of Language and Speech - Anatomy of Speech
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Famous quotes containing the words speech, language and/or architecture:

    True and false are attributes of speech not of things. And where speech is not, there is neither truth nor falsehood. Error there may be, as when we expect that which shall not be; or suspect what has not been: but in neither case can a man be charged with untruth.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679)

    Language is an archeological vehicle ... the language we speak is a whole palimpsest of human effort and history.
    Russell Hoban (b. 1925)

    Polarized light showed the secret architecture of bodies; and when the second-sight of the mind is opened, now one color or form or gesture, and now another, has a pungency, as if a more interior ray had been emitted, disclosing its deep holdings in the frame of things.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)