Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, or spastic colon) is a symptom-based diagnosis characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits. As a functional bowel disorder, IBS has no known organic cause. Diarrhea or constipation may predominate, or they may alternate (classified as IBS-D, IBS-C or IBS-A, respectively). Historically a diagnosis of exclusion, a diagnosis of IBS can now be made on the basis of symptoms alone, in the absence of alarm features such as age of onset greater than 50 years, weight loss, gross hematochezia, systemic signs of infection or colitis, or family history of inflammatory bowel disease. Onset of IBS is more likely to occur after an infection (post-infectious, IBS-PI), a stressful life event, or onset of maturity.

Although there is no cure for IBS, there are treatments that attempt to relieve symptoms, including dietary adjustments, medication and psychological interventions. Patient education and a good doctor-patient relationship are also important.

Several conditions may present as IBS including coeliac disease, fructose malabsorption, mild infections, parasitic infections like giardiasis, several inflammatory bowel diseases, bile acid malabsorption, functional chronic constipation, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and chronic functional abdominal pain. In IBS, routine clinical tests yield no abnormalities, although the bowels may be more sensitive to certain stimuli, such as balloon insufflation testing. The exact cause of IBS is unknown. The most common theory is that IBS is a disorder of the interaction between the brain and the gastrointestinal tract, although there may also be abnormalities in the gut flora or the immune system.

IBS has no effect on life expectancy. However, it is a source of chronic pain, fatigue, and other symptoms and contributes to work absenteeism. The high prevalence of IBS and significant effects on quality of life make IBS a disease with a high social cost.

Read more about Irritable Bowel Syndrome:  Classification, Signs and Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Management, Epidemiology, Sex and Gender Differences, History, Economics, Research

Other articles related to "irritable bowel syndrome, syndrome, irritable bowel":

Irritable Bowel Syndrome - Research
... A randomised controlled trial on IBS patients found relaxing an IgG-mediated food intolerance diet led to a 24% greater deterioration in symptoms compared to those on the elimination diet and concluded food elimination based on IgG antibodies may be effective in reducing IBS symptoms and is worthy of further biomedical research ... Further information NIH funding of IBS Research The National Institutes of Health provides a searchable database for grant awards since 1974 on its CRISP database, and provides dollar amounts for recent awards on its Intramural Grant Award Page ...
Solabegron
... It is being developed for the treatment of overactive bladder and irritable bowel syndrome ... established drug treatments for overactive bladder syndrome such as the anticholinergic agents ... Mirabegron is not licensed for irritable bowel syndrome ...
Ondansetron - Clinical Uses - Investigational and Off-label - Irritable Bowel Syndrome
... antagonists, have been shown to have this effect, which positively impacts irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) ...
NIH Funding Of IBS Research - Supporting Data
... of NIH Funded Research Projects Referring to 'Irritable Bowel' for 2006 Project Number Project Title Dollars Awarded Institution State 5R24DK067674-03 Gastrointestinal Biopsychosocial Research ...

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    [T]he syndrome known as life is too diffuse to admit of palliation. For every symptom that is eased, another is made worse. The horse leech’s daughter is a closed system. Her quantum of wantum cannot vary.
    Samuel Beckett (1906–1989)

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    I who was a house full of bowel movement,
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    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)