Costs

Costs may refer to:

  • Costs (English law)
  • Cost (General)
  • Economic cost
  • Accounting cost

Other articles related to "costs":

Jumbo Mortgage - Costs
... The interest rate charged on jumbo mortgage loans is generally higher than a loan that is conforming, due to the higher risk to the lender ... The spread, or difference between the two rates, depends on the current market price of risk ...
Interpal - Administration Costs and Policies
... Interpals policy is not to deduct administration costs from specified donations ... Administration costs for the past 7 years have been less than 10% of the total annual budget, and they are met from the following sources Donations into the ...
Carpool
... By having more people using one vehicle, carpooling reduces each person's travel costs such as fuel costs, tolls, and the stress of driving ... In addition, carpooling is significantly correlated with transport operating costs, including gas prices and commute length, and also with measures of ...
Inventive Spelling - Benefits and Costs - Costs
... Permitting or encouraging children to spell inventively has some costs ... According to some research, children may learn to spell correctly faster if they are taught to do so in a direct and systematic way ...
Out-of-pocket Expenses - Health Financing
... Out-of-pocket costs are high especially when it comes to prescription drugs in the United States ... in a health care plan, it is very useful to examine the out-of-pocket prescription costs seeing at they may be very low or very high ... High out-of-pocket costs may correlate with lowered prescription adherence ...

Famous quotes containing the word costs:

    To exercise power costs effort and demands courage. That is why so many fail to assert rights to which they are perfectly entitled—because a right is a kind of power but they are too lazy or too cowardly to exercise it. The virtues which cloak these faults are called patience and forbearance.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    When over Catholics the ocean rolls,
    They must wait several weeks before a mass
    Takes off one peck of purgatorial coals,
    Because, till people know what’s come to pass,
    They won’t lay out their money on the dead—
    It costs three francs for every mass that’s said.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)

    Pride can go without domestics, without fine clothes, can live in a house with two rooms, can eat potato, purslain, beans, lyed corn, can work on the soil, can travel afoot, can talk with poor men, or sit silent well contented with fine saloons. But vanity costs money, labor, horses, men, women, health and peace, and is still nothing at last; a long way leading nowhere.—Only one drawback; proud people are intolerably selfish, and the vain are gentle and giving.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)