Fiction - Elements of Fiction

Elements of Fiction

Even among writing instructors and bestselling authors, there is little consensus regarding the number and composition of the fundamental elements of fiction. For example:

  • "Fiction has three main elements: plotting, character, and place or setting." (Morrell 2006, p. 151)
  • "A charged image evokes all the other elements of your story—theme, character, conflict, setting, style, and so on." (Writer's Digest Handbook of Novel Writing 1992, p. 160)
  • "For writers, the spices you add to make your plot your own include characters, setting, and dialogue." (Bell 2004, p. 16)
  • "Contained within the framework of a story are the major story elements: characters, action, and conflict." (Evanovich 2006, p. 83)
  • " . . . I think point of view is one of the most fundamental elements of the fiction-writing craft . . . ." (Selgin 2007, p. 41)

As stated by Janet Evanovich, "Effective writing requires an understanding of the fundamental elements of storytelling, such as point of view, dialogue, and setting." (Evanovich 2006, p. 39) The debate continues as to the number and composition of the fundamental elements of fiction.

Read more about this topic:  Fiction

Other articles related to "elements of fiction, elements, fiction":

Fiction Writing - Elements of Fiction
... as a painter uses color and line to create a painting, an author uses the elements of fiction to create a story The elements of fiction are character, plot, setting, theme, and style ... Of these five elements, character is the who, plot is the what, setting is the where and when, and style is the how of a story ... Style includes the multitude of choices fiction writers make, consciously or subconsciously, as they create a story ...

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