Popular

Popular may refer to:

  • An adjective referring to any people or population
  • Social status, the quality of being well-liked or well-known
  • Popularity, the quality of being well-liked
  • The mainstream, the quality of being common, well-received, in demand, widely understood
    • Popular culture, popular fiction, popular music. popular science
    • Informal usage or custom, as in Popular names, terminology or Nomenclature, as opposed to formal or scientific names, terminology, or nomenclature.
    • Frequently used or selected options, such as given names that are popular in the sense that they occur at high frequency in a population.
  • Populace, the total population of a certain place
    • Populism, a political philosophy seeking to use the instruments of the state to benefit the people as a whole
    • Populous, a 1989 computer game, the seminal god game; see also Populous (series)
  • Popular (TV series), a teenage dramedy on the WB
  • Popular Holdings, a Singapore-based educational book company
  • Popular, Inc., a Puerto Rican-based financial services company, also known as Banco Popular inc
  • The Popular Magazine an American literary magazine that ran for 612 issues from November 1903 to October 1931
  • The Popular (Department Store) was a local chain of department stores in El Paso, Texas that was established in 1902 and closed in 1995

Read more about Popular:  Music

Other articles related to "popular":

History Of Belgium - Interwar Period - Art and Culture
... Comic strips became extremely popular in Belgium during the 1930s ... One of the most popular comics of the 20th century, Hergé's The Adventures of Tintin first appeared in 1929 ... The growth of comic strips was also accompanied by a popular art movement, exemplified by Edgar P ...
Julia (given Name)
... It was the 10th most popular name for girls born in the United States in 2007 and the 88th most popular name for females in the 1990 census there ... It was the 89th most popular name for girls born in England and Wales in 2007 the 94th most popular name for girls born in Scotland in 2007 the 13th most popular name for girls born in Spain in 2006 the ...
Forensic Entomology - In Literature
... Early twentieth-century popular scientific literature began to pique a broader interest in entomology ... The very popular ten-volume book series, Alfred Brehem’s Thierleben (Life of Animals, 1876–1879) expounded on many zoological topics, including arthropods ... and entomology became an established part of Western popular culture, which in turn inspired other scientists to continue and expand upon his research ...
Zé Povinho
... years) the drawings were published in many of the more popular magazines and newspapers such as O António Maria, A Paródia, O Commércio do Porto ... Zé Povinho became, and still is, a popular character in Portugal ... for the powerful ones that try to dominate him, made him popular ...
Wadden Sea - Recreation
... Many of the islands have been popular seaside resorts since the 19th century ... walking on the sandy flats at low tide, has become popular in the Wadden Sea ... It is also a popular region for pleasure boating ...

Famous quotes containing the word popular:

    The new sound-sphere is global. It ripples at great speed across languages, ideologies, frontiers and races.... The economics of this musical esperanto is staggering. Rock and pop breed concentric worlds of fashion, setting and life-style. Popular music has brought with it sociologies of private and public manner, of group solidarity. The politics of Eden come loud.
    George Steiner (b. 1929)

    It is clear that in a monarchy, where he who commands the exceution of the laws generally thinks himself above them, there is less need of virtue than in a popular government, where the person entrusted with the execution of the laws is sensible of his being subject to their direction.
    —Charles Louis de Secondat Montesquieu (1689–1755)

    The press is no substitute for institutions. It is like the beam of a searchlight that moves restlessly about, bringing one episode and then another out of darkness into vision. Men cannot do the work of the world by this light alone. They cannot govern society by episodes, incidents, and eruptions. It is only when they work by a steady light of their own, that the press, when it is turned upon them, reveals a situation intelligible enough for a popular decision.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)