Emancipation

Emancipation this is where any of various efforts to procuring political rights or equality, often for a specifically disenfranchised group, or more generally in discussion of such matters. Emancipation stems from ē manu capere ('take out the hand'). Among others, Karl Marx discussed political emancipation in his 1844 essay "On the Jewish Question", although often in addition to (or in contrast with) the term human emancipation. Marx's views of political emancipation in this work were summarized by one writer as entailing "equal status of individual citizens in relation to the state, equality before the law, regardless of religion, property, or other “private” characteristics of individual people."

"Political emancipation" as a phrase is less common in modern usage, especially outside academic, foreign or activist contexts. However, similar concepts may be referred to by other terms. For instance, in the United States the civil rights movement culminating in the Voting Rights Act of 1965, can be seen as further realization of events such as the Emancipation Proclamation and abolition of slavery a century earlier. In the current and former British West Indies islands the holiday Emancipation Day is celebrated to mark the end of the Atlantic slave trade.

Other articles related to "emancipation":

Post-tonal Music Theory - Overview
... Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern proposed a theory on the emancipation of the dissonance to help analyse the general trend and, in particular, their own atonal music ... such as Charles Ives, Dane Rudhyar, and even Duke Ellington and Lou Harrison, connected the emancipation of the dissonance with the emancipation of society and humanity ... The emancipation of the dominant-quality dissonances has followed this pattern, with the dominant seventh developing in status from a contrapuntal note in the sixteenth century to a quasi-consonant harmonic ...
Misty Copeland - Custody Case
... "The dismissal of the emancipation petition accomplished Sylvia's main goal of keeping the family bonds intact and strong, without interference by third parties.. ... She had heard the term emancipation while in San Francisco the procedure was common among young performers ... The Bradleys introduced Copeland to Steven Bartell, a lawyer who explained the emancipation petition process ...
Arthur Plunkett, 8th Earl Of Fingall - Cause of Catholic Emancipation
... For many years he was a champion of the cause of Catholic Emancipation, and for a time worked closely with Daniel O'Connell to secure it ... with the 1st Duke of Wellington, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, who explained that Catholic Emancipation was not at that time practical politics, but that the remaining Penal Laws would be enforced ...
Liberty Bodice
... The liberty bodice (Australian and British English), like the emancipation bodice or North American emancipation waist, was an undergarment for women and girls invented towards the end of the ... The concept was related to the Women's Emancipation Movement, but in practice some of the early liberty bodices in the UK were advertised for maids who would be freer to get on with their work without a constricting ...
Spanish American Wars Of Independence - Effects of Independence - Society
... labor (Mexico, Central America, Chile), emancipation occurred almost immediately after independence was achieved ... In areas where slavery was a main labor source(Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Argentina), emancipation was carried out in steps over the next three decades, usually first with the creation of free-womb laws and ...

Famous quotes containing the word emancipation:

    The greatest block today in the way of woman’s emancipation is the church, the canon law, the Bible and the priesthood.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    I am not afraid of the priests in the long-run. Scientific method is the white ant which will slowly but surely destroy their fortifications. And the importance of scientific method in modern practical life—always growing and increasing—is the guarantee for the gradual emancipation of the ignorant upper and lower classes, the former of whom especially are the strength of the priests.
    Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)

    The right to vote, or equal civil rights, may be good demands, but true emancipation begins neither at the polls nor in courts. It begins in woman’s soul.
    Emma Goldman (1869–1940)