Who is Elizabeth Cady Stanton?

  • (noun): United States suffragist and feminist; called for reform of the practices that perpetuated sexual inequality (1815-1902).
    Synonyms: Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Her Declaration of Sentiments, presented at the first women's rights convention held in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York, is often credited with initiating the first organized women's rights and women's suffrage movements in the United States.

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First Unitarian Church Of Rochester - History - Early Years
... met in Waterloo with anti-slavery activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton and issued a call for a Women's Rights Convention to be held a short distance away in Seneca Falls, thereby launching the modern women's rights movement ... step of electing a woman to preside, an idea that seemed so radical at the time that even Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, two organizers of the Seneca Falls convention ... Her friend and co-worker Elizabeth Cady Stanton said in 1898, "She first found words to express her convictions in listening to Rev ...
List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Elizabeth Cady Stanton
... (1815–1902) Stanton was an activist in the anti-slavery movement and one of the leading figures of the early women's rights movement ...
Adelaide Johnson - Biography
... Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton however, the marriage ended after twelve years ... Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton ... funding for the piece, Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B ...
Writings of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (author, Co-author) - Selected Papers, Essays, and Speeches
... and Women's Rights" and many others Stanton's papers are archived at Rutgers University The Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B ...

Famous quotes containing the words elizabeth cady stanton, cady stanton, stanton and/or cady:

    So closely interwoven have been our lives, our purposes, and experiences that, separated, we have a feeling of incompleteness—united, such strength of self-association that no ordinary obstacles, difficulties, or dangers ever appear to us insurmountable.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    The Bible and the Church have been the greatest stumbling blocks in the way of women’s emancipation.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    I have met few men in my life, worth repeating eight times.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)

    What an infernal set of fools those schoolmarms must be! Well, if in order to please men they wish to live on air, let them. The sooner the present generation of women dies out, the better. We have idiots enough in the world now without such women propagating any more.
    —Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)