Dominican Republic Cuisine

Dominican Republic cuisine is predominantly made up of a combination of Spanish, indigenous Taíno, and African influences, the first and last occurring over the last five centuries. Dominican cuisine resembles that of other countries in Latin America, those of the nearby islands of Puerto Rico and Cuba, most of all, though the dish names differ sometimes.

Breakfast can consist of eggs or meat and mangú (mashed plantain). A heartier version uses deep-fried meat, such as Dominican salami. As in Spain, the largest, most important meal of the day is lunch. Its most typical form, nicknamed La Bandera ("The Flag"), consists of rice, red beans, meat (beef, chicken, pork, or fish), and salad.

Read more about Dominican Republic CuisineDishes and Their Origins, Other Dishes, Desserts, Beverages, Geographical Differences

Other articles related to "dominican republic cuisine, dominicans, dominican":

Dominican Republic Cuisine - Geographical Differences
... What Dominicans tend to eat depends highly on where they live whether near the sea or in the interior mountains ... In either case, most Dominican meat dishes tend to involve pork, as pigs are farmed quite heavily on the island ... Meat dishes tend to be very well cooked or even stewed in Dominican restaurants, a tradition stemming from the lesser availability of refrigeration on the island ...

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