Constitution - Governmental Constitutions

Governmental Constitutions

Most commonly, the term constitution refers to a set of rules and principles that define the nature and extent of government. Most constitutions seek to regulate the relationship between institutions of the state, in a basic sense the relationship between the executive, legislature and the judiciary, but also the relationship of institutions within those branches. For example, executive branches can be divided into a head of government, government departments/ministries, executive agencies and a civil service/administration. Most constitutions also attempt to define the relationship between individuals and the state, and to establish the broad rights of individual citizens. It is thus the most basic law of a territory from which all the other laws and rules are hierarchically derived; in some territories it is in fact called "Basic Law".

Read more about this topic:  Constitution

Other articles related to "governmental constitutions, constitutions, constitution":

Governmental Constitutions - Façade Constitutions
... also Constitutionalism Italian political theorist Giovanni Sartori noted the existence of national constitutions which are a façade for authoritarian sources of power ... An extreme example was the Constitution of the Soviet Union that on paper supported freedom of assembly and freedom of speech however, citizens who transgressed unwritten limits were summarily imprisoned ... demonstrates that the protections and benefits of a constitution are ultimately provided not through its written terms but through deference by government and society to its principles ...

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