Combustion Chamber

A combustion chamber is the part of an engine in which fuel is burned.

Read more about Combustion Chamber:  Internal Combustion Engine, Steam Engine, Micro Combustion Chambers

Other articles related to "combustion chamber, chamber, combustion, combustion chambers":

Components Of Jet Engines - Major Components
... from the front compressor that bypasses the combustion chamber and gas turbine section that leads directly to the nozzle or afterburner (where fitted) ... And, at the same time, continuing to increase the air pressure before it enters the combustion chamber ... Hot section Combustor or Can or Flameholders or Combustion Chamber — This is a chamber where fuel is continuously burned in the compressed air ...
Scotch Marine Boiler - Combustion Chamber
... of the furnace is an enclosed box called the combustion chamber which extends upwards to link up with the firetubes ... The front wall of the combustion chamber is supported against steam pressure by the tubes themselves ... Above the combustion chamber and tubes is an open steam collecting space ...
Carbureted Compression Ignition Model Engines - Variable Compression
... remains the same, but as the volume of the combustion chamber at top dead center is changed by adjusting the contra-piston, the compression ratio (swept volume ... Larger propellers give a longer combustion time and so higher compression ...
Micro Combustion Chambers
... Micro combustion chambers are the devices in which combustion happens at a very small volume, due to which surface to volume ratio increases which ...
Scotch Marine Boiler - Variants - Inglis
... The "Inglis" modification adds an extra combustion chamber where an additional single large flue returns from the rear to the front of the boiler ... Multiple furnaces would share a single combustion chamber ... Surprisingly this is not from the additional combustion chamber, but from lengthening the narrow firetubes ...

Famous quotes containing the words chamber and/or combustion:

    Experience is never limited, and it is never complete; it is an immense sensibility, a kind of huge spider-web of the finest silken threads suspended in the chamber of consciousness, and catching every air-borne particle in its tissue.
    Henry James (1843–1916)

    The night has been unruly. Where we lay,
    Our chimneys were blown down, and, as they say,
    Lamentings heard i’ th’ air, strange screams of death,
    And prophesying with accents terrible
    Of dire combustion and confused events,
    New-hatched to the woeful time.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)