Average

In mathematics, an average is a measure of the "middle" or "typical" value of a data set. It is thus a measure of central tendency.

In the most common case, the data set is a list of numbers. The average of a list of numbers is a single number intended to typify the numbers in the list. If all the numbers in the list are the same, then this number should be used. If the numbers are not the same, the average is calculated by combining the numbers from the list in a specific way and computing a single number as being the average of the list.

Many different descriptive statistics can be chosen as a measure of the central tendency of the data items. These include the arithmetic mean, the median, and the mode. Other statistics, such as the standard deviation and the range, are called measures of spread and describe how spread out the data is.

The most common statistic is the arithmetic mean, but depending on the nature of the data other types of central tendency may be more appropriate. For example, the median is used most often when the distribution of the values is skewed with a small number of very high or low values, as seen with house prices or incomes. It is also used when extreme values are likely to be anomalous or less reliable than the other values (e.g. as a result of measurement error), because the median takes less account of extreme values than the mean does.


Read more about AverageCalculation, Types, Solutions To Variational Problems, Miscellaneous Types, In Data Streams, Average Values of Functions, Etymology

Other articles related to "average, averages":

Honolulu - Geography - Climate
... Temperatures vary little throughout the months, with average high temperatures of 80–90 °F (27–32 °C) and average lows of 65–75 °F (18–24 °C) throughout the year ... Waters off the coast of Honolulu average 81 °F (27 °C) in the summer months and 77 °F (25 °C) in the winter months ... Annual average rain is 21.1 in (540 mm), which mainly occurs during the winter months of October through early April, with very little rainfall during the summer ...
Geography Of Switzerland - Climate
... generally occur during December-early March with an average temperature of 9 °C (48.2 °F) for elevations between 500–600 metres (1,640–1,969 ft) ... On the Plateau the average precipitation is 1,000 millimetres (39 in) with a range of about 800–1,300 millimetres (31.5–51.2 in) ... of the Alps) typically have more precipitation, with an average of 1,200–1,600 millimetres (47.2–63.0 in), while the high Alps may have over 2,500 millimetres (98.4 in) ...
Louisiana - Geography - Climate
88 68 3.6 57 ... 4.8 48 ... 5.2 43 ... Average max. 18 ... 21 ... 23 ... 22 ... 20 ... 14 ... 9 ... 6 ... Average max. 74 70 ... 3.9 61 ... 4.6 52 ... 4.6 46 ... Average max ...
Geography Of North Korea - Climate
... The daily average high and low temperatures for P'yongyang in January are −3 and −13 °C (27 and 9 °F) ... On average, it snows thirty-seven days during the winter ... The daily average high and low temperatures for Pyongyang in August are 29 and 20 °C (84 and 68 °F) ...
King's Lynn - Geography - Climate
... recorded in August 2003, though in a more average year the warmest day will only reach 29.4c (84.9f), with 13.8 days in total attaining a temperature of 25.1c (77.2f) or more ... All averages refer to the 30 year observation period 1971-2000. 33.5 (92.3) 35.1 (95.2) 29.0 (84.2) 25.0 (77.0) 17.8 (64.0) 16.4 (61.5) 35.1 (95.2) Average high °C (°F) 6.5 (43.7) 7.1 (44.8) 10.0 (50.0) 12.2 (54.0) 15.9 (60.6) 18.7 (65.7) 21.5 (70.7) 21.8 (71.2 ...

Famous quotes containing the word average:

    May you be ordinary;
    Have, like other women,
    An average of talents....
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)

    Whether or not his newspaper and a set of senses reduced to five are the main sources of the so-called “real life” of the so- called average man, one thing is fortunately certain: namely, that the average man himself is but a piece of fiction, a tissue of statistics.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    The average Kentuckian may appear a bit confused in his knowledge of history, but he is firmly certain about current politics. Kentucky cannot claim first place in political importance, but it tops the list in its keen enjoyment of politics for its own sake. It takes the average Kentuckian only a matter of moments to dispose of the weather and personal helath, but he never tires of a political discussion.
    —For the State of Kentucky, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)