Zacharias Werner - Works

Works

He succeeded in having his plays put on the stage, where they met with much success. Verdi's opera Attila is based on Werner's drama of the same name. Werner's Der 24. Februar, thus titled because his mother and an intimate friend died on that day, introduced the era of the so-called “tragedies of fate.” Several of his dramatic poems were designed to evangelize freemasonry. Among his titles were:

  • Vermischte Gedichte, 1789
  • Die Söhne des Thals, 1803-1804, in two parts
  • Die Templer auf Cypern, 1803
  • Die Kreuzesbrüder, 1804
  • Das Kreuz an der Ostsee, 1806
  • Die Brautnacht, 1806
  • Martin Luther oder die Weihe der Kraft, 1806
  • Der vierundzwanzigste Februar, 1808 (translated into French by Jules Lacroix, Paris, 1849)
  • Attila, König der Hunnen, romantische Tragödie, 1809
  • Wanda, 1810
  • Die Weihe der Unkraft, 1813, a recantation of his earlier work Martin Luther
  • Kunigunde die Heilige, 1815
  • Geistliche Übungen für drei Tage, 1818
  • Die Mutter der Makkabäer, 1820

Zacharias Werner's Theater, a collection (without the author's consent) of Werner's work in 6 volumes, appeared in 1816-1818. Ausgewählte Schriften (Selected writings with a biography by K. J. Schütz) in 15 volumes appeared 1840-1841.

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