York Street Railway Station

The York Street Railway Station is a former Canadian Pacific Railway station located on York Street in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

The station opened in 1923 and is a brick structure with sandstone trim; it is distinguished by a tapestry brick patterning which is rare in Fredericton. The station has a hip-roof profile typical of CPR stations of the era and is one of the few brick railway stations remaining in New Brunswick. A covered portico at the west end of the building faced York Street, while the east end contained baggage rooms and freight offices.

Read more about York Street Railway Station:  1962 Service Discontinuation, 1981-1985 Service Resumption, 1993 Abandonment, Structure Degradation, New Development

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