Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (previously known as 'The Sanger Centre') is a non-profit, British genomics and genetics research institute, primarily funded by the Wellcome Trust.

It is located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus by the village of Hinxton, outside Cambridge. It shares this location with the European Bioinformatics Institute. It was established in 1992 as The Sanger Centre, named after double Nobel Laureate, Frederick Sanger. It was conceived as a large scale DNA sequencing centre to participate in the Human Genome Project, and went on to make the largest single contribution to the gold standard sequence of the human genome. From its inception the Institute established and has maintained a policy of data sharing, and does much of its research in collaboration.

Since 2000, the Institute expanded its mission to understand "the role of genetics in health and disease". The Institute now employs around 900 people and engages in four main areas of research: Human genetics, pathogen genetics, mouse and zebrafish genetics and bioinformatics.

Read more about Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute:  History, Leadership, Research, Sequencing, Faculty, Collaborations, Public Engagement, Resources, Graduate Training

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