University of North Dakota

The University of North Dakota (UND) is a public university in Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. Established by the Dakota Territorial Assembly in 1883, six years before the establishment of the state of North Dakota, UND is the oldest and largest university in the state and enrolls over 15,000 students. UND was founded as a university with a strong liberal arts foundation. UND offers a variety of professional and specialized programs, including the only schools of law and medicine in the state. UND is known for its School of Aerospace Sciences which trains airplane pilots from around the world. UND has also been named a space grant institution.

Roughly half of the student body is from North Dakota. UND's economic impact on the state and region is more than $1 billion a year and it is the second largest employer in the state of North Dakota, after the Air Force. UND specializes in health sciences, nutrition, energy and environmental protection, aerospace, and engineering research. Several research institutions are located on the UND campus including the Energy and Environmental Research Center, the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center. The men's ice hockey team has won seven national championships and plays in the Ralph Engelstad Arena. The athletic teams compete at the Division I level.

Read more about University Of North Dakota:  Academics, Research, Athletics, Student Life, Notable People and Alumni

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