University of Michigan Law School

The University of Michigan Law School (Michigan Law) is the law school of the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. Founded in 1859, the school has an enrollment of about 1,200 students, most of whom are seeking Juris Doctor (J.D.) or Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees, although the school also offers a Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) degree. The Law School has 81 full-time faculty members (60 tenured and tenure-track and 21 in clinical and legal practice).

Michigan Law School consistently ranks among the highest-rated law schools in the United States. It was ranked third in the initial U.S. News & World Report law school rankings in 1987, only below Yale and Harvard, and is one of seven schools never to appear outside the magazine's top 10. Michigan Law is also one of the "T14" law schools, that is, schools that have consistently ranked within the top 14 law schools since U.S. News began publishing rankings. In the 2012 U.S. News ranking, Michigan Law is ranked 10th overall. Other 2009 rankings place Michigan as high as second. Michigan Law is currently ranked 6th for International Law. In a 2011 U.S. News "reputational ranking" of law schools by hiring partners at the nation’s top law firms, the University of Michigan Law School ranked 4th. Only Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and Columbia Law School have graduated more Supreme Court Justices than Michigan Law, and Michigan Law has placed more Supreme Court law clerks than any other public law school, with over 50 to date. Michigan Law is also among the handful of schools regularly sending substantial numbers of graduates into law teaching.

Admission to Michigan Law is highly selective, with only 18% of applicants accepted. The most recent class to matriculate has a median LSAT of 169 (top 2 to 3% of test takers) and a median undergraduate GPA of 3.73. Approximately 92.5 percent of the graduating class of 2010 was employed by nine months after graduation. Approximately 31% of the class of 2011 secured positions in one of the nation's 250 largest firms. The majority of Michigan Law grads work in New York, Illinois, California, Washington, D.C. and Michigan.

The law school has graduated the late U.S. Supreme Court Justices Frank Murphy, William Rufus Day, and George Sutherland, as well as a number of heads of state and corporate executives. The school places more graduates in Supreme Court clerkships than any other public law school in the United States. Michigan Law has also placed 32 of its graduates on the state's Supreme Court, including six who served as Chief Justice. More than 170 Michigan law graduates have served as legislators as either United States Senator (20 graduates) or as a Congressional representative (more than 150 graduates).

Read more about University Of Michigan Law School:  History, Law Quad, Publications, Moot Court Competitions, Student Funded Fellowships, Notable Faculty, Notable Alumni

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