Types of Nationalism

Types Of Nationalism

Many scholars argue that there is more than one type of nationalism. Nationalism may manifest itself as part of official state ideology or as a popular (non-state) movement and may be expressed along civic, ethnic, cultural, religious or ideological lines. These self-definitions of the nation are used to classify types of nationalism. However, such categories are not mutually exclusive and many nationalist movements combine some or all of these elements to varying degrees. Nationalist movements can also be classified by other criteria, such as scale and location.

Some political theorists make the case that any distinction between forms of nationalism is false. In all forms of nationalism, the populations believe that they share some kind of common culture. A main reason why such typology can be considered false is that it attempts to bend the fairly simple concept of nationalism to explain its many manifestations or interpretations. Arguably, all "types" of nationalism merely refer to different ways academics throughout the years have tried to define nationalism. This school of thought accepts that nationalism is simply the desire of a nation to self-determine.

Read more about Types Of Nationalism:  Ethnic Nationalism, Civic Nationalism, Expansionist Nationalism, Romantic Nationalism, Cultural Nationalism, Post Colonial Nationalism, Liberation Nationalism, Left-wing Nationalism, Liberal Nationalism, National Conservatism, Anarchism and Nationalism, Religious Nationalism, Pan-nationalism, Diaspora Nationalism, See Also

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