The Genesis Flood: The Biblical Record and Its Scientific Implications

The Genesis Flood: The Biblical Record and its Scientific Implications is a 1961 book by young earth creationists John C. Whitcomb and Henry M. Morris that "produced a stunning renaissance of flood geology," elevating the hypothesis "to a position of fundamentalist orthodoxy" while both polarizing evangelicals and carrying young-earth creationism "to an ever wider Protestant audience."

Read more about The Genesis Flood: The Biblical Record And Its Scientific Implications:  Background, Origins, Contents, Reception, Importance

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