Terah - Christian Tradition

Christian Tradition

The Christian views of the time of Terah come from a passage in the New Testament at Acts 7:2-4 where Stephen said some things that contrast with Jewish Rabbinical views. He said that God appeared to Abraham in Mesopotamia, and directed him to leave the Chaldeans — whereas most Rabbinical commentators see Terah as being the one who directed the family to leave Ur Kasdim from Genesis 11:31: “Terah took his son Abram, his daughter-in-law Sarai (his son Abram’s wife), and his grandson Lot (his son Haran’s child) and left Ur of the Chaldeans to go to the land of Canaan.”


Preceded by
Nahor
Ancestor of Israel
Terah
Succeeded by
Abraham


Adam to David according to the Hebrew Bible
Creation to Flood
  • Adam
  • Seth
  • Enos
  • Kenan
  • Mahalalel
  • Jared
  • Enoch
  • Methuselah
  • Lamech
  • Noah
  • Shem
Cain line
  • Adam
  • Cain
  • Enoch
  • Irad
  • Mehujael
  • Methusael
  • Lamech
  • Tubal-cain
Patriarchs after Flood
  • Arpachshad
  • Shelah
  • Eber
  • Peleg
  • Reu
  • Serug
  • Nahor
  • Terah
  • Abraham
  • Isaac
  • Jacob
Nationhood to Kingship
  • Judah
  • Perez
  • Hezron
  • Ram
  • Amminadab
  • Nahshon
  • Salmon
  • Boaz
  • Obed
  • Jesse
  • David

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