Tacit Knowledge

Tacit knowledge (as opposed to formal or explicit knowledge) is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalising it. For example, stating to someone that London is in the United Kingdom is a piece of explicit knowledge that can be written down, transmitted, and understood by a recipient. However, the ability to speak a language, use algebra, or design and use complex equipment requires all sorts of knowledge that is not always known explicitly, even by expert practitioners, and which is difficult to explicitly transfer to users.

While tacit knowledge appears to be simple, it has far reaching consequences and is not widely understood.

Read more about Tacit Knowledge:  Definition, Differences With Explicit Knowledge, Transmission Models For Tacit Knowledge, Examples, Knowledge Management

Famous quotes containing the words tacit and/or knowledge:

    Money doesn’t mind if we say it’s evil, it goes from strength to strength. It’s a fiction, an addiction, and a tacit conspiracy.
    Martin Amis (b. 1949)

    The ability to think straight, some knowledge of the past, some vision of the future, some skill to do useful service, some urge to fit that service into the well-being of the community,—these are the most vital things education must try to produce.
    Virginia Crocheron Gildersleeve (1877–1965)