Tabulating Machine

The tabulating machine was an electrical device designed to assist in summarizing information and, later, accounting. Invented by Herman Hollerith, the machine was developed to help process data for the 1890 U.S. Census. It spawned a larger class of devices known as unit record equipment and the data processing industry.

The term "Super Computing" was first used by the New York World newspaper in 1931 to refer to a large custom-built tabulator that IBM made for Columbia University.

Read more about Tabulating Machine:  1890 Census, Following The 1890 Census, Operation, Models and Timeline

Famous quotes containing the word machine:

    But a man must keep an eye on his servants, if he would not have them rule him. Man is a shrewd inventor, and is ever taking the hint of a new machine from his own structure, adapting some secret of his own anatomy in iron, wood, and leather, to some required function in the work of the world. But it is found that the machine unmans the user. What he gains in making cloth, he loses in general power.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)