Spatial Memory

In cognitive psychology and neuroscience, spatial memory is the part of memory responsible for recording information about one's environment and its spatial orientation. For example, a person's spatial memory is required in order to navigate around a familiar city, just as a rat's spatial memory is needed to learn the location of food at the end of a maze. It is often argued that in both humans and animals, spatial memories are summarized as a cognitive map. Spatial memory has representations within working, short-term and long-term memory. Research indicates that there are specific areas of the brain associated with spatial memory. Many methods are used for measuring spatial memory in children, adults, and animals.

Read more about Spatial Memory:  Short-term Spatial Memory, Spatial Working Memory, Long-term Spatial Memory, Virtual Reality, Visual – Spatial Distinction, Measuring Spatial Memory, Plasticity, Learning Difficulties and Spatial Memory

Famous quotes containing the word memory:

    Memory is like a purse,—if it be over-full that it cannot shut, all will drop out of it. Take heed of a gluttonous curiosity to feed on many things, lest the greediness of the appetite of thy memory spoil the digestion thereof.
    Thomas Fuller (1608–1661)