Share

Share may refer to:

  • To share a resource (such as food or money) is to make joint use of it; see sharing.
  • Share (finance), a stock or other security such as a mutual fund
  • Share (newspaper), a newspaper in Toronto, Canada
  • Southern Hemisphere Auroral Radar Experiment, tracking space weather from Antarctica
  • Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, a health and social study in Europe
  • Percentage of television sets in use tuned to a program, according to the Nielsen Ratings
  • Plowshare, the cutting blade of a plow (plough)

Computing:

  • Network share, a file storage area that is available over a computer network
  • share (command), a shell command
  • SHARE (computing), a user group for IBM mainframe computers
  • SHARE Operating System, the first operating system, by the SHARE user group
  • Share (P2P), a Japanese P2P computer program, the successor to Winny
  • Share (software), a service of Acrobat.com used for sending files
  • File sharing

Organizations:

  • Share Foundation, a medical charity in Newfoundland
  • Share International, a religious movement founded by British painter Benjamin Creme
  • SHARE cancer support, a New York City organization supporting women with cancer
  • SHARE Foundation (El Salvador), an El Salvador justice organization
  • SHARE in Africa, an American charity organization
  • Skeptics and Humanist Aid and Relief Effort: a charity arm of the Center for Inquiry
  • Students Harness Aid for the Relief of the Elderly, a charity in Cork, Ireland

Famous quotes containing the word share:

    One of the People! Born to be
    Their curious epitome;
    To share yet rise above
    Their shifting hate and love.
    Richard Henry Stoddard (1825–1903)

    What makes loneliness an anguish
    Is not that I have no one to share my burden,
    But this:
    I have only my own burden to bear.
    Dag Hammarskjöld (1905–1961)

    Compare the history of the novel to that of rock ‘n’ roll. Both started out a minority taste, became a mass taste, and then splintered into several subgenres. Both have been the typical cultural expressions of classes and epochs. Both started out aggressively fighting for their share of attention, novels attacking the drama, the tract, and the poem, rock attacking jazz and pop and rolling over classical music.
    W. T. Lhamon, U.S. educator, critic. “Material Differences,” Deliberate Speed: The Origins of a Cultural Style in the American 1950s, Smithsonian (1990)