Scenes of Clerical Life

Scenes of Clerical Life is the title under which George Eliot's first published fictional work, a collection of three short stories, was released in book form, and the first of her works to be released under her famous pseudonym. The stories were first published in Blackwood's Magazine over the course of the year 1857, initially anonymously, before being released as a two-volume set by Blackwood and Sons in January 1858. The three stories are set during the last twenty years of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century over a fifty year period. The Stories take place in and around the fictional town of Milby in the English Midlands. Each of the Scenes concerns a different Anglican clergyman, but is not necessarily centred upon him. Eliot examines, among other things, the effects of religious reform and the tension between the Established and the Dissenting Churches on the clergymen and their congregations, and draws attention to various social issues, such as poverty, alcoholism, and domestic violence.

Read more about Scenes Of Clerical Life:  Background, Reception and Criticism, Subsequent Releases and Interpretations, Bibliography

Other articles related to "scenes of clerical life":

Scenes Of Clerical Life - Bibliography
... Eliot, George (1998) ... Scenes of Clerical Life ...

Famous quotes containing the words scenes of, life, scenes and/or clerical:

    How dear to my heart are the scenes of my childhood,
    When fond recollection presents them to view!
    The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood,
    And every loved spot which my infancy knew,
    Samuel Woodworth (1788–1842)

    Ordinary time is “quality time” too. Everyday activities are not just necessities that keep you from serious child rearing: they are the best opportunities for learning you can give your child...because her chief task in her first three years is precisely to gain command of the day-to-day life you take for granted.
    Amy Laura Dombro (20th century)

    Never before has a generation of parents faced such awesome competition with the mass media for their children’s attention. While parents tout the virtues of premarital virginity, drug-free living, nonviolent resolution of social conflict, or character over physical appearance, their values are daily challenged by television soaps, rock music lyrics, tabloid headlines, and movie scenes extolling the importance of physical appearance and conformity.
    Marianne E. Neifert (20th century)

    How unpleasant to meet Mr. Eliot!
    With his features of clerical cut,
    And his brow so grim
    And his mouth so prim
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)