Roman Rite

The Roman Rite is the liturgical rite used in the Diocese of Rome in the Catholic Church. It is by far the most widespread of the Latin liturgical rites used within the Western or Latin autonomous particular Church, the particular Church that itself is also called the Latin Rite, and that is one of 23 particular churches in full communion with the Bishop of Rome. Like virtually all other liturgical rites, the Roman Rite has grown and been adapted over the centuries. Its Eucharistic liturgy can be divided into three historical stages: Pre-Tridentine, Tridentine, and the Post-Tridentine.

With his 2007 motu proprio Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI approved the continued use of the form in the 1962 Roman Missal, within certain limits in the case of Mass celebrated with the people, as an extraordinary form of the Roman Rite.

Read more about Roman Rite:  Comparison With Eastern Rites, Arrangement of Churches, Chant

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