Right-to-work Law

Right-to-work Law

A "right-to-work" law is a statute in the United States of America that prohibits union security agreements, or agreements between labor unions and employers that govern the extent to which an established union can require employees' membership, payment of union dues, or fees as a condition of employment, either before or after hiring. Right-to-work laws exist in twenty-three U.S. states, mostly in the southern and western United States. Such laws are allowed under the 1947 federal Taft–Hartley Act.

Read more about Right-to-work Law:  The Taft–Hartley Act, U.S. States With Right-to-work Laws

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