Quentin Crisp

Quentin Crisp (born Denis Charles Pratt, (1908-12-25)25 December 1908 – 21 November 1999(1999-11-21)), was an English writer and raconteur.

From a conventional suburban background, Crisp grew up with effeminate tendencies, which he flaunted by parading the streets in make-up and painted nails, and working as a rent-boy. He then spent thirty years as a professional model for life-classes in art colleges, which he said was like being a naked civil servant. His agent suggested that this should be the title of his memoirs, which appeared in 1968. The interviews he gave about his unusual life attracted increasing public curiosity, and he was soon sought-after for his highly individual views on social manners and the cultivating of style. His one-man show was a long-running hit, both in England and America, and he also appeared in films and on TV.

As a high-profile gay person, Crisp defied convention by criticising both Gay Liberation and Princess Diana.

Read more about Quentin Crisp:  Influence and Legacy, Works, Filmography, Discography

Famous quotes by quentin crisp:

    I recommend limiting one’s involvement in other people’s lives to a pleasantly scant minimum. This may seem too stoical a position in these madly passionate times, but madly passionate people rarely make good on their madly passionate promises.
    Quentin Crisp (b. 1908)

    An autobiography is an obituary in serial form with the last instalment missing.
    Quentin Crisp (b. 1908)

    Nothing more rapidly inclines a person to go into a monastery than reading a book on etiquette. There are so many trivial ways in which it is possible to commit some social sin.
    Quentin Crisp (b. 1908)

    Life is a game in which the rules are constantly changing; nothing spoils a game more than those who take it seriously. Adultery? Phooey! You should never subjugate yourself to another nor seek the subjugation of someone else to yourself. If you follow that Crispian principle you will be able to say ‘Phooey,’ too, instead of reaching for your gun when you fancy yourself betrayed.
    Quentin Crisp (b. 1908)

    Of course I lie to people. But I lie altruistically—for our mutual good. The lie is the basic building block of good manners. That may seem mildly shocking to a moralist—but then what isn’t?
    Quentin Crisp (b. 1908)