Principles of War

The earliest known Principles of War were documented by Sun Tzu, circa 500 BCE. Machiavelli published his "General Rules" in 1521. Henry, Duke of Rohan established his "Guides" for war in 1644. Marquis de Silva presented his "Principles" for war in 1778. Henry Lloyd proffered his version of "Rules" for war in 1781 as well as his "Axioms" for war in 1781.Then in 1805, Antoine-Henry Jomini published his "Maxims" for War version 1, "Didactic Resume" and "Maxims" for War version 2. Clausewitz wrote his version in 1812 building on the work of earlier writers.

There are no agreed Principles of War, not even in the NATO alliance although many of its members have their own. The Principles of War identified by Carl von Clausewitz in his essay Principles of War, and later enlarged in his book, On War have been influential on military thinking in the North Atlantic region.

Read more about Principles Of War:  Napoléon Bonaparte, Clausewitz, 20th Century Theory, National Principles of War, Other Uses

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