Primary School

A primary school (from French ├ęcole primaire) is an institution in which children receive the first stage of compulsory education known as primary or elementary education. Primary school is the preferred term in the United Kingdom and many Commonwealth Nations, and in most publications of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In some countries, and especially in North America, the term elementary school is preferred. Children generally attend primary school from around the age of four or five until the age of eleven or twelve. In some places, primary schooling has historically further been divided between lower primary schools (LP schools) and Higher primary schools (HP schools).

Read more about Primary School:  Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Malaysia, Pakistan, Singapore, Somalia, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States

Famous quotes containing the words primary school, primary and/or school:

    At the heart of the educational process lies the child. No advances in policy, no acquisition of new equipment have their desired effect unless they are in harmony with the child, unless they are fundamentally acceptable to him.
    —Central Advisory Council for Education. Children and Their Primary Schools (Plowden Report)

    The primary function of myth is to validate an existing social order. Myth enshrines conservative social values, raising tradition on a pedestal. It expresses and confirms, rather than explains or questions, the sources of cultural attitudes and values.... Because myth anchors the present in the past it is a sociological charter for a future society which is an exact replica of the present one.
    Ann Oakley (b. 1944)

    Nevertheless, no school can work well for children if parents and teachers do not act in partnership on behalf of the children’s best interests. Parents have every right to understand what is happening to their children at school, and teachers have the responsibility to share that information without prejudicial judgment.... Such communication, which can only be in a child’s interest, is not possible without mutual trust between parent and teacher.
    Dorothy H. Cohen (20th century)