Place (United States Census Bureau)

Place (United States Census Bureau)

The United States Census Bureau defines the term place as a concentration of population. The types of places defined by the Census Bureau are incorporated places, such as a city, town or village, and census designated place (CDP), which resembles a city, town or village but lacks its own government. The concentration of population must have a name, be locally recognized, and not be part of any other place. Places typically have a residential nucleus, a closely spaced street pattern and frequently have commercial or other urban types of land use. Incorporated places are defined by the laws of the states that they are in. The Census Bureau designates criteria for delineating CDPs. A small settlement in the open countryside or the densely settled fringe of a large city may not be a place as defined by the Census Bureau. As of the 1990 Census, only 26% of the people in the United States lived outside of places.

Read more about Place (United States Census Bureau):  Incorporated Place, Census Designated Place, Geography

Famous quotes containing the words place and/or states:

    When your fathers fixed the place of GOD,
    And settled all the inconvenient saints,
    Apostles, martyrs, in a kind of Whipsnade,
    Then they could set about imperial expansion
    Accompanied by industrial development.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    The one who first states a case seems right, until the other comes and cross-examines.
    Bible: Hebrew, Proverbs 18:17.