Pearson Language Tests

Pearson Language Tests is a unit of the Pearson PLC group, dedicated to assessing and validating the English language usage of non-native English speakers. The tests include PTE Academic, PTE General (formerly London Tests of English), and PTE Young Learners (formerly London Tests of English for Children). These are scenario-based exams, accredited by the QCA and administered in association with Edexcel, the UK’s largest examining body.

In 2009, Pearson Language Tests launched the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic) (Ref.) which is endorsed by Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), the organisation responsible for the GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test). The test score has been aligned to the levels defined in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEF of CEFR). PTE Academic is delivered through the Pearson VUE centres which are also responsible for delivering the GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) worldwide.

Upon release, it was recognized by nearly 6,000 organizations. The test is approved for use by the UK Border Agency and the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship for visa applications. The test is read by a computer rather than a human grader to reduce waiting times of the results for students.

Read more about Pearson Language Tests:  Pearson Test of English Academic, PTE General, PTE Young Learner Test, Technology

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    Misquotation is, in fact, the pride and privilege of the learned. A widely-read man never quotes accurately, for the rather obvious reason that he has read too widely.
    —Hesketh Pearson (1887–1964)

    The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish squirting out ink.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    Letters have to pass two tests before they can be classed as good: they must express the personality both of the writer and of the recipient.
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)