Open Fields Doctrine

The open fields doctrine is a U.S. legal doctrine created judicially for purposes of evaluating claims of an unreasonable search by the government in violation of the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which states:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Read more about Open Fields Doctrine:  History, Distinguishing Open Fields From Curtilage

Famous quotes containing the words open, fields and/or doctrine:

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    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

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    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)