Occupancy-abundance Relationship

Occupancy-abundance Relationship

In ecology, the occupancy–abundance (O–A) relationship is the relationship between the abundance of species and the size of their ranges within a region. This relationship is perhaps one of the most well-documented relationships in macroecology, and applies both intra- and interspecifically (within and among species). In most cases, the O–A relationship is a positive relationship. Although an O–A relationship would be expected, given that a species colonizing a region must pass through the origin (zero abundance, zero occupancy) and could reach some theoretical maximum abundance and distribution (that is, occupancy and abundance can be expected to co-vary), the relationship described here is somewhat more substantial, in that observed changes in range are associated with greater-than-proportional changes in abundance. Although this relationship appears to be pervasive (e.g. Gaston 1996 and references therein), and has important implications for the conservation of endangered species, the mechanism(s) underlying it remain poorly understood

Read more about Occupancy-abundance Relationship:  Important Terms, Measures of Species Geographic Range, Possible Explanations, Explaining The Occupancy–abundance Relationship, Implications, Importance of The Intraspecific O–A Relationship, Importance of The Interspecific O–A Relationship

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