Natural Language User Interface

Natural Language User Interface

Natural Language User Interfaces (LUI or NLUI) are a type of computer human interface where linguistic phenomena such as verbs, phrases and clauses act as UI controls for creating, selecting and modifying data in software applications.

In interface design natural language interfaces are sought after for their speed and ease of use, but most suffer the challenges to understanding wide varieties of ambiguous input. Natural language interfaces are an active area of study in the field of natural language processing and computational linguistics. An intuitive general Natural language interface is one of the active goals of the Semantic Web.

Text interfaces are 'natural' to varying degrees. Many formal (un-natural) programming languages incorporate idioms of natural human language. Likewise, a traditional keyword search engine could be described as a 'shallow' Natural language user interface.

Read more about Natural Language User Interface:  Overview, History, Challenges, Uses and Applications, See Also

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