National Federation of Federal Employees

National Federation Of Federal Employees

The National Federation of Federal Employees (NFFE) is an American labor union which represents about 100,000 public employees in the federal government.

NFFE has about 200 local unions, most of them agency-wide bargaining units. Its members work primarily in the Department of Defense, the Forest Service, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the General Services Administration, the National Park Service, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Passport Services division of the Bureau of Consular Affairs (Department of State).

Read more about National Federation Of Federal Employees:  Formation, History, Recent Issues, Death of Richard Brown, Presidents

Famous quotes containing the words national, federation, federal and/or employees:

    I came here for one thing only, to try to help national Ireland—and if there is no such thing in existence then the sooner I pay for my illusions the better.
    Roger Casement (1864–1916)

    Women realize that we are living in an ungoverned world. At heart we are all pacifists. We should love to talk it over with the war-makers, but they would not understand. Words are so inadequate, and we realize that the hatred must kill itself; so we give our men gladly, unselfishly, proudly, patriotically, since the world chooses to settle its disputes in the old barbarous way.
    —General Federation Of Women’s Clubs (GFWC)

    Newsmen believe that news is a tacitly acknowledged fourth branch of the federal system. This is why most news about government sounds as if it were federally mandated—serious, bulky and blandly worthwhile, like a high-fiber diet set in type.
    —P.J. (Patrick Jake)

    Exporting Church employees to Latin America masks a universal and unconscious fear of a new Church. North and South American authorities, differently motivated but equally fearful, become accomplices in maintaining a clerical and irrelevant Church. Sacralizing employees and property, this Church becomes progressively more blind to the possibilities of sacralizing person and community.
    Ivan Illich (b. 1926)