National Assembly

National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. The best known National Assembly, and the first legislature to be known by this title, was that established during the French Revolution in 1789, known as the Assemblée nationale. Consequently, the name is particularly common in Francophone countries, but is also found in some Commonwealth countries. In Germany, a Nationalversammlung was elected following the revolutions of 1848–1849 and 1918–1919, to be replaced by a permanent parliament (Reichstag) later. The legislature of the Estado Novo regime in Portugal was dubbed National Assembly, while the Chamber of Corporations was a purely advisory chamber.

It was also the name of the legislature during France's First Republic and the Consulate, and since 1946 has been the lower house of the French parliament, first under the Fourth Republic, and from 1958, the Fifth Republic. The national assembly was also defined in the Republic of China constitution. This is different from the Legislative Yuan by the ROC constitution. In 2005, Taiwan revised the constitution and national assembly becomes history.

Read more about National Assembly:  Unicameral National Legislatures, Lower House of Bicameral National Legislature, Upper House of Bicameral National Legislature, Entire Bicameral Legislature, Historical, Other

Famous quotes containing the words national assembly, national and/or assembly:

    The principle of all sovereignty resides essentially in the nation.
    —French National Assembly. Declaration of the Rights of Man (Sept. 1791)

    The signs look better. The Father of Waters again goes unvexed to the sea. Thanks to the great North-West for it. Nor yet wholly to them.... The job was a great national one.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    That man is to be pitied who cannot enjoy social intercourse without eating and drinking. The lowest orders, it is true, cannot imagine a cheerful assembly without the attractions of the table, and this reflection alone should induce all who aim at intellectual culture to endeavor to avoid placing the choicest phases of social life on such a basis.
    Mrs. H. O. Ward (1824–1899)