Mother Ludlam's Cave

Mother Ludlam's Cave, also known as Mother Ludlum's Cave or Mother Ludlum's Hole, is a small cave in the sandstone cliff of the Wey Valley at Moor Park, near Farnham, Surrey, in England. The cave is the subject of a number of local legends. A spring rising in the cave is recorded in the 13th century "Annals of Waverley Abbey" as "Ludewell"; other spellings through history include "Ludwell" and "Luddwelle". A monk named Symon is credited with identifying the spring as a suitable water supply for Waverley Abbey in 1218, after the original source had dried up. The brothers of the abbey dedicated the spring to St Mary, so it also became known as St Mary's Well. The cave has been naturally formed by the spring but may have been enlarged by the monks and was made into a grotto (possibly during the eighteenth century) and further enhanced by addition of an ironstone arched entrance, possibly during the reign of Queen Victoria.

Read more about Mother Ludlam's Cave:  Origins of The Name, The Legend of Mother Ludlam, The White Witch of Waverley, William Cobbett, Wildlife, Father Foote's Cave

Famous quotes containing the words mother and/or cave:

    A mother is not a person to lean on but a person to make leaning unnecessary.
    Dorothy Canfield Fisher (20th century)

    While yet a boy I sought for ghosts, and sped
    Through many a listening chamber, cave and ruin,
    And starlight wood, with fearful steps pursuing
    Hopes of high talk with the departed dead.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)