Miroslav Volf - Yale Center For Faith and Culture

Yale Center For Faith and Culture

In 2003 Volf founded the Yale Center for Faith and Culture housed at Yale Divinity School. The goal of the center, which he still directs, is to promote the practice of faith in all spheres of life through theological research and leadership development. The goal corresponds to Volf’s abiding interest in “theological ideas with legs.” For the most part, various activities of the Center, housed in discrete “Programs” and “Initiatives,” have mirrored Volf’s own long standing theological interests (“God and Human Flourishing,” “Ethics and Spirituality in the Workplace,” “Reconciliation Program,” “Adolescent Faith and Flourishing,” “Faith and Globalization”).

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