Lone Ranger - Other Media - Novels

Novels

The first Lone Ranger novel appeared in 1936, and eventually 18 volumes were published, as listed below. The first book was written by Gaylord Dubois, but the others were written by the character's primary developer, Fran Striker. Striker also re-edited and rewrote parts of later editions of the first novel. First published between 1936 and 1956 in hardback by Grosset and Dunlap, these stories were reprinted in 1978 by Pinnacle Books.

  • The Lone Ranger (1936)
  • The Lone Ranger and the Mystery Ranch (1938)
  • The Lone Ranger and the Gold Robbery (1939)
  • The Lone Ranger and the Outlaw Stronghold (1939)
  • The Lone Ranger and Tonto (1940)
  • The Lone Ranger at the Haunted Gulch (1941)
  • The Lone Ranger Traps the Smugglers (1941)
  • The Lone Ranger Rides Again (1943)
  • The Lone Ranger Rides North (1943)
  • The Lone Ranger and the Silver Bullet (1948)
  • The Lone Ranger on Powderhorn Trail (1949)
  • The Lone Ranger in Wild Horse Canyon (1950)
  • The Lone Ranger West of Maverick Pass (1951)
  • The Lone Ranger on Gunsight Mesa (1952)
  • The Lone Ranger and the Bitter Spring Feud (1953)
  • The Lone Ranger and the Code of the West (1954)
  • The Lone Ranger and Trouble on the Santa Fe (1955)
  • The Lone Ranger on Red Butte Trail (1956)

Read more about this topic:  Lone Ranger, Other Media

Famous quotes containing the word novels:

    Good novels are not written by orthodoxy-sniffers, nor by people who are conscience-stricken about their own orthodoxy. Good novels are written by people who are not frightened.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    An art whose limits depend on a moving image, mass audience, and industrial production is bound to differ from an art whose limits depend on language, a limited audience, and individual creation. In short, the filmed novel, in spite of certain resemblances, will inevitably become a different artistic entity from the novel on which it is based.
    George Bluestone, U.S. educator, critic. “The Limits of the Novel and the Limits of the Film,” Novels Into Film, Johns Hopkins Press (1957)

    Compare the history of the novel to that of rock ‘n’ roll. Both started out a minority taste, became a mass taste, and then splintered into several subgenres. Both have been the typical cultural expressions of classes and epochs. Both started out aggressively fighting for their share of attention, novels attacking the drama, the tract, and the poem, rock attacking jazz and pop and rolling over classical music.
    W. T. Lhamon, U.S. educator, critic. “Material Differences,” Deliberate Speed: The Origins of a Cultural Style in the American 1950s, Smithsonian (1990)