London Post Office Railway Rolling Stock

London Post Office Railway Rolling Stock

The Post Office Railway, also known as Mail Rail, was a narrow-gauge driverless underground railway in London, built by the Post Office with assistance from the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, to move mail between sorting offices. Inspired by the Chicago Tunnel Company, it operated from 3 December 1927 until 31 May 2003.

Read more about London Post Office Railway Rolling Stock:  Geography, History, Closure, Rolling Stock, In Fiction, Similar Railways

Famous quotes containing the words london, post, office, railway, rolling and/or stock:

    You owe me ten shillings,
    Say the bells of St. Helen’s.
    When will you pay me?
    Say the bells of Old Bailey.
    When I grow rich,
    Say the bells of Shoreditch.
    Pray when will that be?
    Say the bells of Stepney.
    I am sure I don’t know,
    Says the great bell of Bow.
    —Unknown. The Bells of London (l. 13–22)

    I had rather be shut up in a very modest cottage, with my books, my family and a few old friends, dining on simple bacon, and letting the world roll on as it liked, than to occupy the most splendid post which any human power can give.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    No man will ever bring out of that office the reputation which carries him into it. The honeymoon would be as short in that case as in any other, and its moments of ecstasy would be ransomed by years of torment and hatred.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    He wrote me sad Mother’s Day stories. He’d always kill me in the stories and tell me how bad he felt about it. It was enough to bring a tear to a mother’s eye.
    Connie Zastoupil, U.S. mother of Quentin Tarantino, director of film Pulp Fiction. Rolling Stone, p. 76 (December 29, 1994)

    In the case of our main stock of well-worn predicates, I submit that the judgment of projectibility has derived from the habitual projection, rather than the habitual projection from the judgment of projectibility. The reason why only the right predicates happen so luckily to have become well entrenched is just that the well entrenched predicates have thereby become the right ones.
    Nelson Goodman (b. 1906)