List of United States Presidential Vetoes

List Of United States Presidential Vetoes

The word presidential veto does not appear in the United States Constitution, but Article I requires every bill, order, resolution or other act of legislation by the Congress of the United States to be presented to the President of the United States for his approval. When the President is presented the bill, he can either sign it into law, return the bill to the originating house of Congress with his objections to the bill (a veto), or neither sign nor return it to Congress after having been presented the bill for ten days exempting Sundays (if Congress is still in session, the bill becomes a law; otherwise, the bill does not become a law and is considered a pocket veto). The list below contains many of the bills vetoed and pocket vetoed by Presidents.

Read more about List Of United States Presidential Vetoes:  Logic of Vetoes, Veto Threat, Summary of Vetoes

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