Kimberly Elise - Television Work

Television Work

Year Title Role Notes
1995 Newton's Apple Bile duct supervisor Episode "Jungle Survival/Liver/Emus"
1995 In the House Roulette Credited as Kimberly Elise Oldham
Episode "Nanna Don't Play"
1996 Sentinel Candace Blake Episode "Black or White"
1997 The Ditchdigger's Daughters Jeanette TV movie
CableACE Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Movie or Miniseries
2000 The Loretta Claiborne Story Loretta Claiborne TV movie
2001 Bojangles Fannie TV movie
Black Reel Award for Best Supporting Actress: Television Movie/Cable
Nominated – NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Television Movie, Mini-Series or Dramatic Special
2002 The Twilight Zone Jasmine Gardens / Police Detective Episode "Another Life"
2003 Girlfriends Reesie Jackson Episodes " The Fast Track & the Furious", "The Pact"
2002-2003 Soul Food Estella Episodes "Falling from Grace", "Emotional Collateral"
Nominated – NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
2005-2007 Close to Home Maureen Scofield NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series
Nominated – NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series
2007 Private Practice Angie Paget Episode "In Which Charlotte Goes Down the Rabbit Hole"
2007 Masters of Science Fiction Tilly Vee TV mini-series
2009 Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story Sonya Carson TV movie
NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actress in a Television Movie, Mini-Series or Dramatic Special
MovieGuide Award for Best Actress
Nominated – Prism Award for Best Performance By an Actress in a TV Movie or Miniseries
2009 Grey's Anatomy Dr. Swender TV series
Episodes "Here's to Future Days", "Sweet Surrender", " Elevator Love Letter"
2011 Hawthorne Episode "A Shot in the Dark"
2012 Hannah's Law Stagecoach Mary TV movie
2013 Bounce Sloane

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Famous quotes containing the words television and/or work:

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