Keystroke-level Model

Keystroke-level model, sometimes referred to as KLM or KLM-GOMS, is an approach to human–computer interaction (HCI), developed by David Kieras and based on CMN-GOMS. CMN-GOMS for its part was developed by Card, Moran, and Newell, and explained in their book The Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction, 1983. The model is an 11-step method that can be used by individuals or companies seeking ways to estimate the time it takes to complete simple data input tasks using a computer and mouse. By using KLM-GOMS, individuals often find more efficient or better ways to complete a task simply by analyzing the steps required in the process and rearranging or eliminating unneeded steps.

It is designed to be easier to use than other GOMS methods, such that companies who cannot afford human–computer interaction specialists can use it. KLM-GOMS is usually applied in situations that require minimal amounts of work and interaction with a computer interface or software design. The calculations and the number of steps required to accurately compute the overall task time increase quickly as the number of tasks involved increases. Thus, KLM-GOMS is best suited to evaluate and time specific tasks that require, on average, less than 5 minutes to complete.

The KLM-GOMS model is designed to be as straightforward as possible. The sequence of operations is modeled as a sequence of a small number of operations. Each operation is assigned a duration, which is intended to model the average amount of time an experienced user would take to perform it.

Read more about Keystroke-level Model:  Step Terminology, Testing Steps, Example Calculation

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