John Dewey

John Dewey (/ˈduːi/; October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. Dewey was an important early developer of the philosophy of pragmatism and one of the founders of functional psychology. He was a major representative of progressive education and liberalism.

Although Dewey is known best for his publications concerning education, he also wrote about many other topics, including experience, nature, art, logic, inquiry, democracy, and ethics.

In his advocacy of democracy, Dewey considered two fundamental elements—schools and civil society—as being major topics needing attention and reconstruction to encourage experimental intelligence and plurality. Dewey asserted that complete democracy was to be obtained not just by extending voting rights but also by ensuring that there exists a fully formed public opinion, accomplished by effective communication among citizens, experts, and politicians, with the latter being accountable for the policies they adopt.

Read more about John Dewey:  Life and Works, Functional Psychology, Pragmatism and Instrumentalism, Logic and Method, On Democracy, On Education, On Journalism, On Humanism, Social and Political Activism, Other Interests, Criticism, Academic Awards, Honors, Publications, Works About Dewey

Famous quotes containing the words john and/or dewey:

    This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.
    Bible: New Testament Matthew, 3:17.

    A “voice from heaven,” following the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist.

    It is part of the educator’s responsibility to see equally to two things: First, that the problem grows out of the conditions of the experience being had in the present, and that it is within the range of the capacity of students; and, secondly, that it is such that it arouses in the learner an active quest for information and for production of new ideas. The new facts and new ideas thus obtained become the ground for further experiences in which new problems are presented.
    —John Dewey (1859–1952)