Issue

Issue may refer to:

  • Issue (legal), a legal term
  • A single instance of a periodically published journal, magazine, or newspaper
  • Issue (magazine), a monthly Korean comics anthology magazine
  • Issues, a Jewish magazine published by the American Council for Judaism
  • Issue (computers), a unit of work to accomplish an improvement in a data system
  • Issue tracking system, computer software
  • Issuer, a legal entity that develops, registers and sells securities
  • Issues (Korn album), 1999
  • Issues (N2U album), 2005
  • "Issues", a song from the 2008 Mindless Self Indulgence album if
  • "Issues" (The Saturdays song), 2008
  • "Issues" (Escape the Fate song)
  • Issue, a term for the children or descendants of a person
  • Issue, a term for a postage stamp, or series of postage stamps, that has been officially released for use
  • Issue, Maryland
  • Issues with Jane Velez-Mitchell, a nightly TV newscast on HLN
  • Issues (band), a metalcore band from Atlanta, Georgia
  • Issues, mental problems.

Famous quotes containing the word issue:

    Because of these convictions, I made a personal decision in the 1964 Presidential campaign to make education a fundamental issue and to put it high on the nation’s agenda. I proposed to act on my belief that regardless of a family’s financial condition, education should be available to every child in the United States—as much education as he could absorb.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    For Banquo’s issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murdered;
    Put rancors in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seeds of Banquo kings!
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Parents are led to believe that they must be consistent, that is, always respond to the same issue the same way. Consistency is good up to a point but your child also needs to understand context and subtlety . . . much of adult life is governed by context: what is appropriate in one setting is not appropriate in another; the way something is said may be more important than what is said. . . .
    Stanley I. Greenspan (20th century)