Irish National Cycling Championships

The Irish National Cycling Championships are annual cycling races to decide the Irish cycling champion for several disciplines, across several categories of rider.

The men's road championship is usually held on a Sunday at end of June; the women's race is held the previous day. The winning élite rider wears the national champion's jersey for all road races in the following 12 months. The men's under-23 champion is awarded to the first under-23 in the élite race. The junior road races are held on the same day as the élite and the time-trial championship is earlier in the week. The national criteriums are later in the summer. The 2012 races are: Thurs 21 June - Time Trials (senior, U23/espoir, women); Sat 23 June - women's, veterans road races; Sun 24 June - senior, U23/espoir, women road races.

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    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)