Individualist Anarchism in The United States

Individualist anarchism in the United States was strongly influenced by Josiah Warren, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lysander Spooner, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Max Stirner, Herbert Spencer, and Henry David Thoreau.

The first American anarchist publication was The Peaceful Revolutionist, edited by Josiah Warren, whose earliest experiments and writings predate Pierre Proudhon.

Other important individualist anarchists in the United States were Stephen Pearl Andrews, William Batchelder Greene, Ezra Heywood, M. E. Lazarus, John Beverley Robinson, James L. Walker, Joseph Labadie, Steven Byington, Albert Jay Nock, and Laurance Labadie.

Read more about Individualist Anarchism In The United States:  Overview, Free Love, Freethought, The "Boston Anarchists", American Individualist Anarchism and The Labor Movement, American Egoism, Since 1945

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